Aviva Presser Aiden

Aviva aiden

Aviva Presser Aiden, MD PhD completed her doctoral work at Harvard and MIT. She is continuing her research and her medical training in global child health at the Texas Medical Center in Houston, where she lives with her husband and four children. Aviva co-founded Bears Without Borders, an organization fostering economic opportunities among developing-world artisans, and is co-founder and CTO of Lebônê, a social enterprise developing microbial fuel cells as an off-grid energy and lighting solution for Africa. These initiatives have received significant public acclaim, including a novella inspired by Bears Without Borders and New York Times coverage of Lebônê's technology. Aviva can be reached at aviva.ajws@gmail.com.

Shlach

The Jewish people are approaching the culmination of the Exodus experience—the long-awaited fulfillment of the promise to the Patriarchs that their children would one day inherit the Land of Canaan. They are camped right at the border when the now-ominous words that open Parashat Shlach appear—“Send for yourself men to spy out the land of Canaan”—the beginning of the end for this generation.

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Vaera

Parashat Vaera describes part of perhaps the most famous narrative in Jewish history—the Exodus. Moshe and Aharon were appointed as Divine emissaries to Pharaoh, demanding the release of the Israelites from the bondage of Egypt. Refused, Moshe and Aharon were then tasked with bringing plagues upon Egypt, ostensibly to compel Pharaoh to release the Jewish people. The first of these plagues was the plague of blood.

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Shlach

The Jewish people are approaching the culmination of the Exodus experience—the long-awaited fulfillment of the promise to the Patriarchs that their children would one day inherit the Land of Canaan. They are camped right at the border when the now-ominous words that open Parashat Shlach appear—“Send for yourself men to spy out the land of Canaan”—the beginning of the end for this generation.

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Ki Tetze

In Parshat Ki Tetze, the Torah describes the mitzvah of yibum, the levirate marriage, which is invoked when a man dies without children. Yibum requires that the man’s eldest brother marry the widow and father children that will bear the name of the deceased, in order that the lineage not be lost from Israel.[1] Acknowledging …Read More

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Matot-Masei

Parshat Masei opens as the wanderings of the Israelites are coming to an end. The land east of the Jordan has been conquered and divided, and God is commanding Moshe regarding the procedures to be followed upon entering Israel. Included in these commandments is a verse that dictates that when the Jews enter Canaan, they …Read More

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Matot-Masei

Parshat Masei opens as the wanderings of the Israelites are coming to an end. The land east of the Jordan has been conquered and divided, and God is commanding Moshe regarding the procedures to be followed upon entering Israel. Included in these commandments is a verse that dictates that when the Jews enter Canaan, they …Read More

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Shlach

The Jewish people are approaching the culmination of the Exodus experience—the long-awaited fulfillment of the promise to the Patriarchs that their children would one day inherit the Land of Canaan. They are camped right at the border when the now-ominous words that open Parshat Shlach appear—“Send for yourself men to spy out the land of …Read More

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Acharei Mot-Kedoshim

At the outset of Parshat Kedoshim, all Israel receives the nebulous command of “kedoshim tihiyu . . .—You shall be holy, for I am holy; I am the Lord your God.”[1] The text then proceeds to enumerate numerous laws appearing to detail the requirements of this injunction. Within this collection of verses we find an …Read More

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Acharei Mot-Kedoshim

At the outset of Parshat Kedoshim, all Israel receives the nebulous command of “kedoshim tihiyu . . .—You shall be holy, for I am holy; I am the Lord your God.”[1] The text then proceeds to enumerate numerous laws appearing to detail the requirements of this injunction. Within this collection of verses we find an …Read More

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Ki Tisa

The detailed description of the building and consecration of the Tabernacle, which spans several parshiot, is framed by a pair of financial appeals. The opening appeal, in Parshat Terumah, speaks to the generosity of the people—“Take for Me contributions from those whose heart moves them…”[1] Chapters later, in Parshat Ki Tisa, the description closes with …Read More

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